SW Biweekly – Regan Smith: Locked In Prior To Olympic Trials – On Sale Now!

slider 06-07-21 copy
Regan Smith on the cover of SW Biweekly [PHOTO CREDIT: PETER H. BICK]

The latest issue of Swimming World Biweekly
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In this issue of SW Biweekly, read about how Regan Smith has been preparing for Trials and Tokyo after a lengthy postponement; Also featured is news of Lia Neal’s retirement announcement; Caeleb Dressel’s upcoming Olympic challenges; Olivia Smoliga out to defend her Trials title; Katie Drabot aims for the U.S. Olympic Team; The story of Charles Jackson French, of the U.S. Navy, and how he towed a raft full of shipwrecked mates through shark infested waters; How Reece Whitley set himself up for a good swim at Trials; How Abbey Weitzel has been working on “taming mind” ahead of her Trials performance; Katie McLaughlin talks her new perspective from coaching; Brooke Forde rides NCAA Title momentum into Trials while taking a fifth year at Stanford; How Mallory Comerford got her stride back just before Trials; and How They Train with U.S. open water swimmer Haley Anderson


SW Biweekly 6-7-21 - Regan Smith - Locked In Prior To Olympic Trials - COVER[PHOTO CREDIT: PETER H. BICK]


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FEATURES

008  LIA NEAL ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT FROM SWIMMING, REFLECTS ON HER SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
by David Rieder
Lia Neal, the second African American female swimmer to qualify for a U.S. Olympic team and win an Olympic medal—and the first to accomplish those feats twice—announced her retirement from swimming. She explained that the pandemic-induced layoff allowed her to gain a different and broader perspective on swimming and life.

012 CAELEB DRESSEL AND THE OBSTACLES AWAITING HIS OLYMPIC SHOWCASE
by David Rieder
After winning seven gold medals at the 2017 World Championships, then a record-breaking eight total medals at the 2019 version of the meet, Caeleb Dressel now gets a shot at taking his signature steamrolling to the Olympic level. It’s possible he could win seven gold medals in Tokyo, but he will also be facing a series of difficult challenges  this July.

014 OLIVIA SMOLIGA LOOKING TO DEFEND HER TRIALS TITLE IN “LOADED” 100 BACKSTROKE, MAKE MARK IN FREESTYLE
by Dan D’Addona
Olivia Smoliga, who stunned the swimming world when she won the 100 backstroke at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, is now a veteran looking to fend off the new wave in women’s backstroke. “I am going in with the intention to race how I have been training, and know I am capable of competing in multiple events,” she said.

016 KATIE DRABOT SEES 200 FLY TRANSFORM FROM PROVING GREG MEEHAN WRONG (FOR ONCE) TO JOINING WORLD’S ELITE
by Dan D’Addona
Katie Drabot has represented the United States at just about every other international meet other than the Olympics, including winning a bronze medal in the 200 fly at the 2019 World Championships. After a year of upheaval with the COVID-19 pandemic, Drabot has put together a solid training block as she aims for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team.

018 REGAN SMITH HANDLING STRESSES AND REGAINING HER MOJO IN TIME FOR OLYMPIC TRIALS
by David Rieder
After dominating women’s backstroke at the 2019 World Championships, Regan Smith became the overwhelming favorite for Olympic gold in the 100 and 200 back. But her momentum and sense of can-do-no-wrong were broken by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, with Trials fast approaching, Smith can be certain that she has done everything possible to be at her best at the right time.

024 CHARLES JACKSON FRENCH: A HERO FOR OUR TIME
by Bruce Wigo
Charles Jackson French of the U.S. Navy towed a raft full of his shipwrecked mates to safety—through shark-infested waters—after the sinking of the USS Gregory off the Solomon Islands in World War II.

030 REECE WHITLEY PUTTING PIECES TOGETHER TO “SET MYSELF UP FOR A GOOD SWIM” AT OLYMPIC TRIALS
by Dan D’Addona
While many swimmers get more tense and feel more pressure heading into the Olympic Trials, Reece Whitley is feeling more relaxed. Knowing that he has put in the preparation mentally as well as physically, Whitley is excited for the opportunity and poised for a strong meet.

032 ABBEY WEITZEIL WORKING ON “TAMING MIND” BEFORE UNLEASHING EVERYTHING AT TRIALS
by Dan D’Addona
When Abbey Weitzeil steps onto the block, she puts everything into her race—body, mind and heart—to get to the wall first. On the mental side, the key is to have everything blocked out and be ready to roar. Weitzeil is healthy and ready to rip it at Trials, hoping to make her second Olympic team.

034 KATIE McLAUGHLIN FINDS NEW PERSPECTIVE HEADING INTO OLYMPIC TRIALS—FROM COACHING
by Dan D’Addona
After graduating from Cal as one of the team’s key members, Katie McLaughlin was starting to struggle as a professional swimmer. But she was able to gain a new perspective about herself and the sport when she started to coach: “It’s given me so much more gratitude and better appreciation for what I get to do and more of a purpose.”

036 BROOKE FORDE RIDING MOMENTUM OF NCAA TITLE IN 400 IM INTO OLYMPIC TRIALS; WILL TAKE FIFTH YEAR AT STANFORD
by Dan D’Addona
Brooke Forde is looking forward to simply having a healthy swim at the U.S. Olympic Trials—a simple goal, but one that was far from reality at the 2016 Trials when the Stanford national champion was recovering from viral meningitis. Now, Forde will be in contention to make the Olympic team in the 400 IM, heading to the 2021 Trials stronger, wiser—and healthier.

038 MALLORY COMERFORD: “FINALLY FEELING LIKE MYSELF IN THE WATER” HEADING INTO OLYMPIC TRIALS
by Dan D’Addona
Mallory Comerford rose to become one of the world’s best swimmers through regimented training, a clear focus and planning ahead. But since the COVID-19 pandemic—plus dealing with some injuries—Comerford, like most swimmers, lost her regular routine with the ever-changing circumstances. But she feels encouraged with her recent practices as she prepares for the U.S. Olympic Trials: “Now, everything is moving in the right direction.”

040 HOW THEY TRAIN: HALEY ANDERSON
by Michael J. Stott

041 PARTING SHOT